Herbs in Your Salad Garden.

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I’m writing from my point of view because I know the Herbs I like to cook with on a daily basis,. When we get together we can talk about your preference and what herbs you use daily.

Scallions

Scallians
Photo by Christopher Previte on Unsplash

For example I love scallions.   I could use it in practically every meal,… even with my eggs.  Scallions are part of the onion family.   They can be planted about 1/4” deep.  They are considered perennial.  They love sun.

If you grow them indoors, they can be planted 4 weeks before being transplanted outdoors.  Or they can be directly seeded in the ground.  Scallions also provide vitamin c, iron, calcium, vitamin b6 and magnesium.

Garlic

Garlic
Photo by Shelley Pauls on Unsplash

Garlic loves well drained soil.  It’s  best to plant one clove instead of the whole blub.  Be sure to space them about 6″ apart.  It’s best to plant in the fall  around October for harvesting the next year.  They are perennials so they’ll  come back next year.

Garlic works great as a natural antibiotic.  Garlic also works well as a pest control.  That is one reason I like to plant then  in my  Kitchen Salad Garden. They keep most pests from nibbling my salads.  There are  a variety of types of Garlic, so check with local gardener to find the ones that grows best in your area.  You can dig the blubs after the top has dried off and place them in single layers to dry.

Ginger

Ginger
Photo by Shelley Pauls on Unsplash

I love Ginger!, Ginger is also considered a natural antibiotic.  It’s  good for the cold or flu and great in a brown stew!   

It doesn’t like full blown sun.  Partial shade will work fine.  I’ve found  they grow better in pots.  That’s why they do well in a garden container.  Place your harvested Ginger in paper towel sealed in a plastic bag in the refrigerator it will last about 1 month.

Thyme

Thyme
Photo by Rudy Issa on Unsplash

Thyme is an all round favorite!  It gives great flavor to your meals and a creates a pleasant aroma in your garden.  It prefers well drained soil.  You need to plant Thyme outdoors in the spring, about 1 foot  apart. This plant is also a perennial.  So, it will come back every year for about 3 years– then it’s best to replace them.

If you plant Thyme in your raised bed with tomatoes and potatoes, it will help repel  certain bugs like cabbageworm and whiteflies.  Thyme prefers full sun over partial shade.

So, these are a few of my favorite herbs to grow.  I will introduce more as time goes by.

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